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5 positives to gain from practising self-isolation

1
Practising self-isolation, words we had probably never heard of a mere few months ago. In these incredibly daunting and unpredictable times in which we find ourselves, it’s easy to focus on fear. But. I’ve been racking my brain to consider what self-isolation, lockdown and social distancing can offer us. Apart from divorce, cabin fever and weight gain here’s my (at the moment, speak to me in a few weeks) optimistic viewpoint.
1 – Time.
Yes, folks, we’ll get time back from practising self-isolation. No commuting, school runs or the pressure of
SelfishMother.com
2
being anywhere on time. In fact, barely going out gives us a whole new semblance of time on our hands (ignore the bit about the kids being off school, that just steals time). I’m a stickler for being punctual so perhaps this utter oddness of not being required to be anywhere will feel quite sumptuous and stress-free. But yes I will be a bore.
2 – Try something new
Which comes from this abundance of time. We all have our ’If I only I had more time’ scenarios, well peeps, YOU HAVE TIME. As parents we will still see our ’free’ time somehow swallowed
SelfishMother.com
3
up by caring for our kids, but think of all the time you will save from not being out. Use it to invest in something you have long considered an impossibility which might kill some time and give some sense of achievement.

Because let’s face it, I’m not relying on homeschooling to offer me a sense of achievement. That is more likely to add twenty or so years to me, alcoholism and clear confirmation that teaching is not, in fact, my lost vocation.
3 – Staying in-in rather that out-out
Hear me out, please. I’m not a magician, I can’t pretend that

SelfishMother.com
4
practising self-isolation is going to allow us back to the pub anytime soon or that staying in is as exciting as going out and seeing friends. It’s more about being creative and adding variety while practising self-isolation. For example, why can’t you start up a virtual book club? If a book club doesn’t quite set the fire within you, how about a quiz?

We’re so wired to going out and socialising face-to-face that it’s about challenging those habits and applying old social practices to our new, albeit temporary, virtual world. No one said this

SelfishMother.com
5
would be easy, but it’s a culture open to suggestions and creative practices. I’m wondering how far we can take this; create your own Magic Mike show using your partner. Good god.
4 – Catching up with those you rarely see
It’s weird practising self-isolation and the concept has no sense of distance if you practice it virtually. What I mean by that is usually during a weekend I see friends who I can physically see face-to-face. Yet now, that’s exactly what I’m doing. Maybe once this if over and we stop practising self-isolation our social
SelfishMother.com
6
interactions will change or we’ll quickly revert to old social habits. Who am I kidding, the minute my freedom is back I’ll be out that door quicker than a rat up a drainpipe to get out the house, don the glad rags and get smashed with the girls.
5 – Back to basics
We don’t know how long we will be practising self-isolation and social distancing. Neither do we know the outcomes and realities of what it will feel like. I feel a bit panicky about what happens if we get some sort of food rationing and how I will cope with the already vile homeschooling
SelfishMother.com
7
if I have to break it to one of mine that they can’t temporarily have their favourite yoghurt. And then I realise how spoilt that makes them.

Stiff upper lip folks, we have no idea how long we are going to have our ’taken for granted’ freedom limited. It’s going to be tough with incredibly hard days ahead. I predict an increase in divorce, alcoholic parents, dark roots and mental health challenges. Don’t beat yourself up if you are rubbish at teaching your kids, screw the mum guilt and if in doubt dish out more snacks.

Be creative, be

SelfishMother.com
8
different and see what wonders you will emerge with the other side.
SelfishMother.com
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practising self-isolation

- 24 Mar 20

Practising self-isolation, words we had probably never heard of a mere few months ago. In these incredibly daunting and unpredictable times in which we find ourselves, it’s easy to focus on fear. But. I’ve been racking my brain to consider what self-isolation, lockdown and social distancing can offer us. Apart from divorce, cabin fever and weight gain here’s my (at the moment, speak to me in a few weeks) optimistic viewpoint.

1 – Time.

Yes, folks, we’ll get time back from practising self-isolation. No commuting, school runs or the pressure of being anywhere on time. In fact, barely going out gives us a whole new semblance of time on our hands (ignore the bit about the kids being off school, that just steals time). I’m a stickler for being punctual so perhaps this utter oddness of not being required to be anywhere will feel quite sumptuous and stress-free. But yes I will be a bore.

2 – Try something new

Which comes from this abundance of time. We all have our ‘If I only I had more time’ scenarios, well peeps, YOU HAVE TIME. As parents we will still see our ‘free’ time somehow swallowed up by caring for our kids, but think of all the time you will save from not being out. Use it to invest in something you have long considered an impossibility which might kill some time and give some sense of achievement.

Because let’s face it, I’m not relying on homeschooling to offer me a sense of achievement. That is more likely to add twenty or so years to me, alcoholism and clear confirmation that teaching is not, in fact, my lost vocation.

3 – Staying in-in rather that out-out

Hear me out, please. I’m not a magician, I can’t pretend that practising self-isolation is going to allow us back to the pub anytime soon or that staying in is as exciting as going out and seeing friends. It’s more about being creative and adding variety while practising self-isolation. For example, why can’t you start up a virtual book club? If a book club doesn’t quite set the fire within you, how about a quiz?

We’re so wired to going out and socialising face-to-face that it’s about challenging those habits and applying old social practices to our new, albeit temporary, virtual world. No one said this would be easy, but it’s a culture open to suggestions and creative practices. I’m wondering how far we can take this; create your own Magic Mike show using your partner. Good god.

4 – Catching up with those you rarely see

It’s weird practising self-isolation and the concept has no sense of distance if you practice it virtually. What I mean by that is usually during a weekend I see friends who I can physically see face-to-face. Yet now, that’s exactly what I’m doing. Maybe once this if over and we stop practising self-isolation our social interactions will change or we’ll quickly revert to old social habits. Who am I kidding, the minute my freedom is back I’ll be out that door quicker than a rat up a drainpipe to get out the house, don the glad rags and get smashed with the girls.

5 – Back to basics

We don’t know how long we will be practising self-isolation and social distancing. Neither do we know the outcomes and realities of what it will feel like. I feel a bit panicky about what happens if we get some sort of food rationing and how I will cope with the already vile homeschooling if I have to break it to one of mine that they can’t temporarily have their favourite yoghurt. And then I realise how spoilt that makes them.

Stiff upper lip folks, we have no idea how long we are going to have our ‘taken for granted’ freedom limited. It’s going to be tough with incredibly hard days ahead. I predict an increase in divorce, alcoholic parents, dark roots and mental health challenges. Don’t beat yourself up if you are rubbish at teaching your kids, screw the mum guilt and if in doubt dish out more snacks.

Be creative, be different and see what wonders you will emerge with the other side.

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Corporate to Kids

Who: Sarah - Queen of self-deprecation Job: from corporate HR career to Mum, Writer and Blogger Children: two boys with a 13 month age gap!! Obsessions: writing, Haribos, rainbows, coffee, fizz

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