close
SM-Stamp-Join-1
  • Selfish Mother is the most brilliant blogging platform. Join here for free & you can post a blog within minutes. We don't edit or approve your words before they go live - it's up to you. And, with our cool new 'squares' design - you can share your blog to Instagram, too. What are you waiting for? Come join in! We can't wait to read what YOU have to say...

  • Your basic information

  • Your account information

View as: GRID LIST

Fabulous New Year’s resolutions or destined to fail?

1
I made only two New Year’s resolutions for 2020 and random they are too. But I’ve gone for areas of change rather than ridiculous fads that I won’t keep beyond January 2020. I don’t know why so many of us succumb to the pressure of making New Year’s resolutions. Perhaps it’s motivational to start something new or implement change on the fresh page of a new year. On the other hand, maybe it’s because December becomes such a month of overindulgence and routine removal that we are desperate for change. No matter how extreme.

Is it really worth

SelfishMother.com
2
committing to something that will last five minutes and then leave us feeling guilty for the remainder of the year?
Sticking to New Year’s resolutions
I don’t want to be a resolution fun sponge, but the odds of sticking to New Year’s resolutions are low. Studies show that only 25% of individuals remain committed to their resolutions by the end of January. A mere 8% achieve their resolutions for the year. So, with such a low success rate maybe we need to approach change in a different way rather than relying on strict New Year’s resolutions. Maybe
SelfishMother.com
3
setting goals is more realistic.
A jog, not a sprint
It’s easy to want immediate change. By nature, I think most of us are impatient about implementing change when we make the decision. Yet it’s pretty difficult to stick to really big changes or strict, regimented routines. Take exercise for example. It becomes a bit of a joke that the gym will be severely overpopulated in January, more breathable in February and back to normal in March. I don’t know if that’s because so many people decide on fitness as a New Year’s resolution or because we have a
SelfishMother.com
4
tendency to hit it so hard that it becomes unsustainable. Pace yourself.
Consider what is achievable
I’m all for healthy living and high expectations, but I think being realistic is key to achieving new year’s resolutions or annual goals. Say if you’re a business owner and you want to triple your profit in 2020. It might be achievable, but surely aiming too high is more likely to result in underachievement, which may be perceived as a failure. Which can potentially mess up your motivation and confidence for the following year. It’s about setting
SelfishMother.com
5
goals that are doable, maintainable and realistic. The classic SMART goal setting approach. I knew I’d get that little coaching beauty into my blog one day
Short-term goals?
Some people pooh-pooh New Year’s resolutions and prefer to opt for the short-term intense route. Take those partaking in dry January. It’s basically alcohol abstinence for the entire month and then whatever approach to booze you want for the remaining eleven months. Not a bad way to do it, but does that just mean you go back to general boozing in February? It’s not for me. I
SelfishMother.com
6
try and cut back on booze in January, but damn it the month is miserable.
My goals for 2020
Number 1, entertain at home more rather than going out and spending loads of money. Number 2, focus on a plant-based diet now and again. Let me be clear before you ditch me right now. I am in no way planning to be a stay at home vegan. Okay, I admit it, I watched the Game Changers on Netflix and I don’t think it would be a bad thing for me to reduce my meat intake. I’m not going plant-based every day so the pressure is not there. If I can do it, I will when it
SelfishMother.com
7
suits.

I appreciate that my New Year’s resolutions are a little ridiculous and slightly noncommittal and unmeasurable. But they suit me. They are unlikely to radically change my life, but it feels like I’m going into 2020 with some change, albeit minor. With work, I tend to set weekly and monthly goals, so I don’t want to add pressure to them with grand resolution status. I am aiming to publish my novel this year, but with the complexities of how to publish, I’m adding it firmly to the goals pile.

I’ll keep you posted while I chew my lentil

SelfishMother.com
8
bake at home with friends.
SelfishMother.com
Corporate to Kids

By

This blog was originally posted on SelfishMother.com - why not sign up & share what's on your mind, too?

Why not write for Selfish Mother, too? You can sign up for free and post immediately.


We regularly share posts on @SelfishMother Instagram and Facebook :)

New Year's resolutions

- 6 Jan 20

I made only two New Year’s resolutions for 2020 and random they are too. But I’ve gone for areas of change rather than ridiculous fads that I won’t keep beyond January 2020. I don’t know why so many of us succumb to the pressure of making New Year’s resolutions. Perhaps it’s motivational to start something new or implement change on the fresh page of a new year. On the other hand, maybe it’s because December becomes such a month of overindulgence and routine removal that we are desperate for change. No matter how extreme.

Is it really worth committing to something that will last five minutes and then leave us feeling guilty for the remainder of the year?

Sticking to New Year’s resolutions

I don’t want to be a resolution fun sponge, but the odds of sticking to New Year’s resolutions are low. Studies show that only 25% of individuals remain committed to their resolutions by the end of January. A mere 8% achieve their resolutions for the year. So, with such a low success rate maybe we need to approach change in a different way rather than relying on strict New Year’s resolutions. Maybe setting goals is more realistic.

A jog, not a sprint

It’s easy to want immediate change. By nature, I think most of us are impatient about implementing change when we make the decision. Yet it’s pretty difficult to stick to really big changes or strict, regimented routines. Take exercise for example. It becomes a bit of a joke that the gym will be severely overpopulated in January, more breathable in February and back to normal in March. I don’t know if that’s because so many people decide on fitness as a New Year’s resolution or because we have a tendency to hit it so hard that it becomes unsustainable. Pace yourself.

Consider what is achievable

I’m all for healthy living and high expectations, but I think being realistic is key to achieving new year’s resolutions or annual goals. Say if you’re a business owner and you want to triple your profit in 2020. It might be achievable, but surely aiming too high is more likely to result in underachievement, which may be perceived as a failure. Which can potentially mess up your motivation and confidence for the following year. It’s about setting goals that are doable, maintainable and realistic. The classic SMART goal setting approach. I knew I’d get that little coaching beauty into my blog one day

Short-term goals?

Some people pooh-pooh New Year’s resolutions and prefer to opt for the short-term intense route. Take those partaking in dry January. It’s basically alcohol abstinence for the entire month and then whatever approach to booze you want for the remaining eleven months. Not a bad way to do it, but does that just mean you go back to general boozing in February? It’s not for me. I try and cut back on booze in January, but damn it the month is miserable.

My goals for 2020

Number 1, entertain at home more rather than going out and spending loads of money. Number 2, focus on a plant-based diet now and again. Let me be clear before you ditch me right now. I am in no way planning to be a stay at home vegan. Okay, I admit it, I watched the Game Changers on Netflix and I don’t think it would be a bad thing for me to reduce my meat intake. I’m not going plant-based every day so the pressure is not there. If I can do it, I will when it suits.

I appreciate that my New Year’s resolutions are a little ridiculous and slightly noncommittal and unmeasurable. But they suit me. They are unlikely to radically change my life, but it feels like I’m going into 2020 with some change, albeit minor. With work, I tend to set weekly and monthly goals, so I don’t want to add pressure to them with grand resolution status. I am aiming to publish my novel this year, but with the complexities of how to publish, I’m adding it firmly to the goals pile.

I’ll keep you posted while I chew my lentil bake at home with friends.

Did you enjoy this post? If so please support the writer: like, share and comment!


Why not join the SM CLUB, too? You can share posts & events immediately. It's free!

Corporate to Kids

Who: Sarah - Queen of self-deprecation Job: from corporate HR career to Mum, Writer and Blogger Children: two boys with a 13 month age gap!! Obsessions: writing, Haribos, rainbows, coffee, fizz

Post Tags


Keep up to date with Selfish Mother — Sign up for our newsletter and follow us on social media